Today's Document

Jul 24

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ourpresidents:

Nixon and Khrushchev’s Kitchen Debates
On this day in 1959, Vice President Richard Nixon and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev met for the opening of the American National Exhibition in Moscow. 
As Nixon led Khrushchev through the model house they began a series of impromptu debates (mainly held in the model kitchen), on capitalism and communism.  To debate such ideas both leaders used examples of household appliances to better stress their arguments.  Nixon’s performance in the “Kitchen Debate” further raised his stature back in the United States.
In this photograph we have Nixon and Khrushchev debating in front of the now famous model kitchen.  To the right of Nixon is future Soviet General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev.  7/24/59.
-from the Nixon Library 

ourpresidents:

Nixon and Khrushchev’s Kitchen Debates

On this day in 1959, Vice President Richard Nixon and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev met for the opening of the American National Exhibition in Moscow.

As Nixon led Khrushchev through the model house they began a series of impromptu debates (mainly held in the model kitchen), on capitalism and communism.  To debate such ideas both leaders used examples of household appliances to better stress their arguments.  Nixon’s performance in the “Kitchen Debate” further raised his stature back in the United States.

In this photograph we have Nixon and Khrushchev debating in front of the now famous model kitchen.  To the right of Nixon is future Soviet General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev.  7/24/59.

-from the Nixon Library 


Recovery of Apollo 11 Astronauts, 07/24/1969
From the series: Photographs of the “Apollo Projects,” Apollo 4 through Apollo/Soyuz, 1967 - 1978

Having spent 21 hours and 36 minutes on the moon, the Apollo 11 astronauts returned to Earth on July 24, 1969, and were recovered by the USS Hornet after splashing down in the Pacific Ocean.
Miss one of our earlier posts from Apollo 11’s 45th anniversary? See the rest of our #Apollo45 series!

Recovery of Apollo 11 Astronauts, 07/24/1969

From the series: Photographs of the “Apollo Projects,” Apollo 4 through Apollo/Soyuz, 1967 - 1978

Having spent 21 hours and 36 minutes on the moon, the Apollo 11 astronauts returned to Earth on July 24, 1969, and were recovered by the USS Hornet after splashing down in the Pacific Ocean.

Miss one of our earlier posts from Apollo 11’s 45th anniversary? See the rest of our #Apollo45 series!

Jul 23

It’s #BatmanDay!
todaysdocument:

Happy 75th Birthday, Batman!
On March 30, 1939, Detective Comics #27 hit newsstands, introducing evil-doers and comic book lovers everywhere to the Caped Crusader.

Batman Comic Book,No. 1 Spring Issue, 1940
From the series: Series : Civil Case Files, compiled 1938 - 1983, Records of District Courts of the United States, 1685 - 2009.
From the scope & content note: This comic book was an exhibit in the case titled Fox Publications Inc. v. Detective Comics Inc., Independent News Co. Inc. and Interborough News Co.

It’s #BatmanDay!

todaysdocument:

Happy 75th Birthday, Batman!

On March 30, 1939, Detective Comics #27 hit newsstands, introducing evil-doers and comic book lovers everywhere to the Caped Crusader.

Batman Comic Book,No. 1 Spring Issue, 1940

From the series: Series : Civil Case Files, compiled 1938 - 1983, Records of District Courts of the United States, 1685 - 2009.

From the scope & content note: This comic book was an exhibit in the case titled Fox Publications Inc. v. Detective Comics Inc., Independent News Co. Inc. and Interborough News Co.

ourpresidents:

President Truman - Just Stopping By
On this day in 1947, President Harry S. Truman stopped by the U.S. Capitol unannounced.  According to the President’s appointment calendar for the day:

"While at the Capitol, the President visited the Senate Chamber, took his old seat, was recognized by the President of the Senate and made a brief impromptu speech."

Addressing the senators around him, he said, “I get homesick for this seat.  I spent the best 10 years of my life in this seat.”
More - Search Truman’s White House Appointment Book from the Truman Library
Photo: Senator Harry S. Truman on the Capitol Steps, circa 1940.

ourpresidents:

President Truman - Just Stopping By

On this day in 1947, President Harry S. Truman stopped by the U.S. Capitol unannounced.  According to the President’s appointment calendar for the day:

"While at the Capitol, the President visited the Senate Chamber, took his old seat, was recognized by the President of the Senate and made a brief impromptu speech."

Addressing the senators around him, he said, “I get homesick for this seat.  I spent the best 10 years of my life in this seat.”

More - Search Truman’s White House Appointment Book from the Truman Library

Photo: Senator Harry S. Truman on the Capitol Steps, circa 1940.

Jul 22

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DILLINGER SHOT TO DEATH BY FEDERAL AGENTS AFTER HUNT
CHICAGO, ILL.—-Leaving a small theatre on the North Side, America’s Public Enemy Number One finds death waiting at the hands of sixteen Federal men. Sensing his danger, Dillinger started to draw his gun, but bullets reached his heart before he was able to reach his pocket, ending a career of crime unparalleled in modern police annals.

Excerpted from:  Universal News, Volume 6, Release 269, Story #1, July 23, 1934

On the run following a Federal warrant and nationwide manhunt, notorious Depression-era gangster John Dillinger was killed by Federal agents outside a movie theater in Chicago eighty years ago on July 22, 1934.  A few of his more memorable personal effects are displayed for the camera in this Universal Newsreel.

The complete newsreel is available on the National Archives’ YouTube channel. Note that the clip includes footage of Dillinger’s body in the morgue and may be considered too graphic for some viewers.

Keep reading at Prologue: Pieces of History » A Public Enemy’s Life in the Fast Lane

DILLINGER SHOT TO DEATH BY FEDERAL AGENTS AFTER HUNT
CHICAGO, ILL.—-Leaving a small theatre on the North Side, America’s Public Enemy Number One finds death waiting at the hands of sixteen Federal men. Sensing his danger, Dillinger started to draw his gun, but bullets reached his heart before he was able to reach his pocket, ending a career of crime unparalleled in modern police annals.
Excerpted from:  Universal News, Volume 6, Release 269, Story #1, July 23, 1934
On the run following a Federal warrant and nationwide manhunt, notorious Depression-era gangster John Dillinger was killed by Federal agents outside a movie theater in Chicago eighty years ago on July 22, 1934.  A few of his more memorable personal effects are displayed for the camera in this Universal Newsreel.
The complete newsreel is available on the National Archives’ YouTube channel. Note that the clip includes footage of Dillinger’s body in the morgue and may be considered too graphic for some viewers.
Keep reading at Prologue: Pieces of History » A Public Enemy’s Life in the Fast Lane

Jul 21


Photograph of Ascent Stage of Apollo 11, 07/21/1969

Photograph of Ascent Stage of Apollo 11, 07/21/1969

Happy 115th Birthday, Ernest Hemingway!
Author Ernest Hemingway enjoys a drink with other war correspondents on the island of Mont St. Michel, off northern France, in the summer of 1944.  Born on July 21, 1899, the author would have likely celebrated his 45th birthday a few weeks before this scene.

Excerpted from: D-Day to Germany, 1944
From the series: Motion Picture Films Relating to the Invasion of Normandy (D-Day) and Commemorative Visits After the War, compiled 1944 - 1969. Collection LIEB: Jack Lieb Collection, 1944 - 1969

Taken by newsreel cameraman Jack Lieb, this color home movie was donated by the Lieb family to the National Archives in 1984. You’ll see D-Day from a perspective different than the official military film or commercial newsreel. With his personal footage, Lieb takes the viewer through the preparations in England, where he spent time with war correspondents Ernie Pyle, Jack Thompson, and Larry LaSueur, to the liberation of Paris and finally into Germany. Along the way, Lieb captured his experience on 16mm Kodachrome, filming everyday people in France and the occasional celebrity, such as Edward G. Robinson or Ernest Hemingway. (Hemingway shows up around 26:45.)


Via The Unwritten Record » A Newsreel Cameraman’s View of D-Day

Happy 115th Birthday, Ernest Hemingway!

Author Ernest Hemingway enjoys a drink with other war correspondents on the island of Mont St. Michel, off northern France, in the summer of 1944.  Born on July 21, 1899, the author would have likely celebrated his 45th birthday a few weeks before this scene.

Excerpted from: D-Day to Germany, 1944

From the series: Motion Picture Films Relating to the Invasion of Normandy (D-Day) and Commemorative Visits After the War, compiled 1944 - 1969Collection LIEB: Jack Lieb Collection, 1944 - 1969

Taken by newsreel cameraman Jack Lieb, this color home movie was donated by the Lieb family to the National Archives in 1984. You’ll see D-Day from a perspective different than the official military film or commercial newsreel. With his personal footage, Lieb takes the viewer through the preparations in England, where he spent time with war correspondents Ernie PyleJack Thompson, and Larry LaSueur, to the liberation of Paris and finally into Germany. Along the way, Lieb captured his experience on 16mm Kodachrome, filming everyday people in France and the occasional celebrity, such as Edward G. Robinson or Ernest Hemingway. (Hemingway shows up around 26:45.)

Via The Unwritten Record » A Newsreel Cameraman’s View of D-Day

ourpresidents:

Morley Safer’s interviewed Betty Ford for the CBS news program “60 Minutes.” They taped the interview in the White House Solarium on July 21, 1975.The “60 Minutes” segment marked Mrs. Ford’s first extensive, exclusive TV interview. Safer questioned her on a number of topics including her experiences as a politician’s wife, openness about her breast cancer, and support for women’s rights, particularly the Equal Rights Amendment. Safer noted that unlike many political wives, for Betty Ford “the higher your husband’s gotten, the more really controversial things have been said.” This interview would be no exception. She called the Supreme Court’s ruling to legalize abortion “a great, great decision,” and discussed premarital sex and the possibility of her children using drugs.After the segment aired on August 10 the White House received a deluge of negative comments regarding Mrs. Ford’s position on these issues. Public mail ran 2 to 1 against Mrs. Ford, although more positive comments came in over time. In the long run her approval rating increased after the controversy died down.According to Sheila Weidenfeld, Mrs. Ford’s press secretary, the First Lady later sent Safer an autographed picture inscribed, “If there are any questions you forgot to ask – I’m grateful.”
-from the Ford Library 

ourpresidents:

Morley Safer’s interviewed Betty Ford for the CBS news program “60 Minutes.” They taped the interview in the White House Solarium on July 21, 1975.

The “60 Minutes” segment marked Mrs. Ford’s first extensive, exclusive TV interview. Safer questioned her on a number of topics including her experiences as a politician’s wife, openness about her breast cancer, and support for women’s rights, particularly the Equal Rights Amendment. 

Safer noted that unlike many political wives, for Betty Ford “the higher your husband’s gotten, the more really controversial things have been said.” This interview would be no exception. She called the Supreme Court’s ruling to legalize abortion “a great, great decision,” and discussed premarital sex and the possibility of her children using drugs.

After the segment aired on August 10 the White House received a deluge of negative comments regarding Mrs. Ford’s position on these issues. Public mail ran 2 to 1 against Mrs. Ford, although more positive comments came in over time. In the long run her approval rating increased after the controversy died down.

According to Sheila Weidenfeld, Mrs. Ford’s press secretary, the First Lady later sent Safer an autographed picture inscribed, “If there are any questions you forgot to ask – I’m grateful.”

-from the Ford Library 

(via fordlibrarymuseum)

Know someone headed to summer camp?  Share these bullying prevention tips from our colleagues at stopbullying:
stopbullying:

Excited. Nervous. Scared. Going away to camp can bring about a variety of feelings. Whether it’s sports camp, adventure camp, or music camp, most camps are equipped to understand and address bullying. Read our bullying prevention tips to learn more about bullying prevention and camp!

Know someone headed to summer camp?  Share these bullying prevention tips from our colleagues at stopbullying:

stopbullying:

Excited. Nervous. Scared. Going away to camp can bring about a variety of feelings. Whether it’s sports camp, adventure camp, or music camp, most camps are equipped to understand and address bullying. Read our bullying prevention tips to learn more about bullying prevention and camp!


 “Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 Commander inside the Lunar Module (LM) as it rests on the lunar surface after completion of the Extravehicular Activities (EVA).” 
National Archives Local Identifier: 255-AMP-as11-37-5528

 “Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 Commander inside the Lunar Module (LM) as it rests on the lunar surface after completion of the Extravehicular Activities (EVA).” 

National Archives Local Identifier: 255-AMP-as11-37-5528

(Source: blogs.archives.gov)

Jul 20

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