Today's Document

Aug 01

[video]

Jul 31

This Week in Universal News: A Hovercraft Crosses the English Channel, 1959:

HOVERCRAFT SKIMS CHANNEL: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the first flight across the English Channel, Britain’s saucer-shaped “Hovercraft” skims from Calais to Dover, only inches above the surface.
Clip from Universal News, Volume 32, Release 61, Stories #1-4A, July 30, 1959



Via The Unwritten Record » This Week in Universal News: A Hovercraft Crosses the English Channel, 1959

This Week in Universal News: A Hovercraft Crosses the English Channel, 1959:

HOVERCRAFT SKIMS CHANNEL: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the first flight across the English Channel, Britain’s saucer-shaped “Hovercraft” skims from Calais to Dover, only inches above the surface.

Clip from Universal News, Volume 32, Release 61, Stories #1-4A, July 30, 1959

Via The Unwritten Record » This Week in Universal News: A Hovercraft Crosses the English Channel, 1959


Photograph taken by the Ranger VII spacecraft before it impacted on the Moon at 6:25 a.m. PDT July 31. Viewed with the three large shallow craters in the lower left hand corner, North is at the top of the picture. It was taken by the F-a camera with a 25mm. f/1 lens from an attitude of 480 miles. It duplicates closely resolution obtained in Earth-based photography. The large open dark crater in lower margin is Lubiniezky. 

Fifty years ago the Ranger VII spacecraft returned the first close up images of the lunar surface from a U.S. space probe.
Leading up to the Apollo missions, NASA worked to learn about the lunar surface and excite the public for the coming manned mission. Project Ranger fulfilled both objectives by flying satellites directly into the moon. Just before impact, the Ranger probes would send back a flurry of high definition images of the lunar surface. While the first six Ranger probes failed, Ranger VII managed to transmit stunning images of the moon, like this one, back to Earth.
Via Congress and the Early Exploration of Space Documents — Image from Ranger VII, 1964

Photograph taken by the Ranger VII spacecraft before it impacted on the Moon at 6:25 a.m. PDT July 31. Viewed with the three large shallow craters in the lower left hand corner, North is at the top of the picture. It was taken by the F-a camera with a 25mm. f/1 lens from an attitude of 480 miles. It duplicates closely resolution obtained in Earth-based photography. The large open dark crater in lower margin is Lubiniezky. 

Fifty years ago the Ranger VII spacecraft returned the first close up images of the lunar surface from a U.S. space probe.

Leading up to the Apollo missions, NASA worked to learn about the lunar surface and excite the public for the coming manned mission. Project Ranger fulfilled both objectives by flying satellites directly into the moon. Just before impact, the Ranger probes would send back a flurry of high definition images of the lunar surface. While the first six Ranger probes failed, Ranger VII managed to transmit stunning images of the moon, like this one, back to Earth.

Via Congress and the Early Exploration of Space Documents — Image from Ranger VII, 1964


"Are you sure you got the kind in the book?"
Urban Gardener, 07/31/1919
From the series: Berryman Political Cartoon Collection, 1896 - 1949

Cartoonist Clifford Berryman reflects on the plight of the urban gardener, ca. 1919. How’s your garden doing this summer?

"Are you sure you got the kind in the book?"

Urban Gardener, 07/31/1919

From the series: Berryman Political Cartoon Collection, 1896 - 1949

Cartoonist Clifford Berryman reflects on the plight of the urban gardener, ca. 1919. How’s your garden doing this summer?

Jul 30

These government agencies are surprisingly awesome at Tumblr -

Nice mentions of todaysdocument, ourpresidents, usnatarchivesexhibits, americasgreatoutdoors, congressarchives and fdrlibrary.

Thanks, dailydot!

congressarchives:

It’s #MuseumCats day!
Political cartoonist Clifford K. Berryman used cats or cat-inspired images for a number of his drawings that are part of the U.S. Senate Collection here at the National Archives. In this drawing, Berrmyan depicted Speaker of the House of Representatives Joseph G. Cannon as a Cheshire cat. Shortly before this cartoon appeared, Cannon had taunted his critics and defied them to attack him. Unfazed by such bravado, the insurgents led a successful campaign that stripped Cannon of most of his authority the following year. 
“Who’ll Bell the Cat?” by Clifford K. Berryman, 12/3/1909, Records of the U.S. Senate (NAID 6010830)

congressarchives:

It’s #MuseumCats day!

Political cartoonist Clifford K. Berryman used cats or cat-inspired images for a number of his drawings that are part of the U.S. Senate Collection here at the National Archives. In this drawing, Berrmyan depicted Speaker of the House of Representatives Joseph G. Cannon as a Cheshire cat. Shortly before this cartoon appeared, Cannon had taunted his critics and defied them to attack him. Unfazed by such bravado, the insurgents led a successful campaign that stripped Cannon of most of his authority the following year. 

Who’ll Bell the Cat?” by Clifford K. Berryman, 12/3/1909, Records of the U.S. Senate (NAID 6010830)

Happy #MuseumCats Day!

A patron of “Sammy’s Bowery Follies,” a downtown bar, sleeping at his table while the resident cat laps at his beer, 12/1947

We have a few feline-related records in the holdings of the National Archives, but this one is a perennial favorite.
Also sort of a two-for, as we can get a head start for International #BeerDay on August 1!

Happy #MuseumCats Day!

A patron of “Sammy’s Bowery Follies,” a downtown bar, sleeping at his table while the resident cat laps at his beer, 12/1947

We have a few feline-related records in the holdings of the National Archives, but this one is a perennial favorite.

Also sort of a two-for, as we can get a head start for International #BeerDay on August 1!

ourpresidents:

 LBJ and Harry Truman, when LBJ went to Independence on 7/30/65 to sign the Medicare Bill. 
-from the LBJ Library 

ourpresidents:

 LBJ and Harry Truman, when LBJ went to Independence on 7/30/65 to sign the Medicare Bill. 

-from the LBJ Library 


"…the conduct of the Senator from Wisconsin, Mr. McCarthy, is unbecoming a Member of the United States Senate, is contrary to senatorial traditions, and tends to bring the Senate into disrepute, and such conduct is hereby condemned."

congressarchives:

Senator Joseph McCarthy (R-WI) caught the attention of the nation during a speech in West Virginia on February 9, 1950 in which he claimed he held in his a hand a list of 205 names of people who were Communists working in the State Department. While not everyone was convinced of McCarthy’s allegations, he remained unscathed by numerous Senate investigations into his various claims of communism in the government.
In 1952, McCarthy was made chairman of the Senate Government Operations Committee and the Committee’s Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. It was as chairman of these two committees that McCarthy waged his full-scale attack on communists in the government. He investigated the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the International Information Agency (IIA), and the U.S. Army. The nationally televised hearings of the U.S. Army eventually lead to McCarthy’s political demise. His brutal tactics and reckless questioning gave his colleagues in the Senate more than enough motivation and evidence to put an end to his attacks.
On July 30, 1954, Senator Ralph Flanders (R-VT) introduced a resolution for censure to the Senate. The resolution was referred to a six-member subcommittee. The subcommittee issued its recommendation of censure on September 27. The Senate began debate on the subcommittee’s recommendation on November 8. The Senate finally came to a vote on December 2. The resolution was passed, 67-22, to censure McCarthy for contempt and abuse contrary to senatorial traditions and ethics.
S Res 301, 7/30/1954, SEN 83A-B4, Records of the U.S. Senate (1157557)

"…the conduct of the Senator from Wisconsin, Mr. McCarthy, is unbecoming a Member of the United States Senate, is contrary to senatorial traditions, and tends to bring the Senate into disrepute, and such conduct is hereby condemned."

congressarchives:

Senator Joseph McCarthy (R-WI) caught the attention of the nation during a speech in West Virginia on February 9, 1950 in which he claimed he held in his a hand a list of 205 names of people who were Communists working in the State Department. While not everyone was convinced of McCarthy’s allegations, he remained unscathed by numerous Senate investigations into his various claims of communism in the government.

In 1952, McCarthy was made chairman of the Senate Government Operations Committee and the Committee’s Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. It was as chairman of these two committees that McCarthy waged his full-scale attack on communists in the government. He investigated the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the International Information Agency (IIA), and the U.S. Army. The nationally televised hearings of the U.S. Army eventually lead to McCarthy’s political demise. His brutal tactics and reckless questioning gave his colleagues in the Senate more than enough motivation and evidence to put an end to his attacks.

On July 30, 1954, Senator Ralph Flanders (R-VT) introduced a resolution for censure to the Senate. The resolution was referred to a six-member subcommittee. The subcommittee issued its recommendation of censure on September 27. The Senate began debate on the subcommittee’s recommendation on November 8. The Senate finally came to a vote on December 2. The resolution was passed, 67-22, to censure McCarthy for contempt and abuse contrary to senatorial traditions and ethics.

S Res 301, 7/30/1954, SEN 83A-B4, Records of the U.S. Senate (1157557)

Jul 29


Night firing of 155mm rifle. Guam, July 29, 1944
From the series: General Photograph File of the U.S. Marine Corps, 1927 - 1981

via National Archives at Kansas City on Twitter

Night firing of 155mm rifle. Guam, July 29, 1944

From the series: General Photograph File of the U.S. Marine Corps, 1927 - 1981

via National Archives at Kansas City on Twitter

[video]

[video]

Jul 28

ourpresidents:

Jacqueline Kennedy was born on this day in 1929, in Southhampton, New York.  She was named Jacqueline Lee Bouvier.  Her father, John, was a stockbroker on Wall Street whose family had come from France in the early 1800s. Her mother, Janet, had ancestors from Ireland and England. 
As a child, Jackie loved to read. Before she started school, she had read all the children’s books on her bookshelves. Her heroes were Mowgli from Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book, Robin Hood, Little Lord Fauntleroy’s grandfather, Scarlett O’Hara from Gone With the Wind, and the poet Byron.
Learn more about growing up as Jacqueline Kennedy from the JFK Library
Photo: Jacqueline Bouvier, 1935. Photograph by David Berne in the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston.

ourpresidents:

Jacqueline Kennedy was born on this day in 1929, in Southhampton, New York.  She was named Jacqueline Lee Bouvier.  Her father, John, was a stockbroker on Wall Street whose family had come from France in the early 1800s. Her mother, Janet, had ancestors from Ireland and England. 

As a child, Jackie loved to read. Before she started school, she had read all the children’s books on her bookshelves. Her heroes were Mowgli from Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book, Robin Hood, Little Lord Fauntleroy’s grandfather, Scarlett O’Hara from Gone With the Wind, and the poet Byron.

Learn more about growing up as Jacqueline Kennedy from the JFK Library

Photo: Jacqueline Bouvier, 1935. Photograph by David Berne in the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston.

congressarchives:

225th Anniversary of the First Congress: We’ll be posting documents and stories highlighting the establishment of the new government under the Constitution through March 2016.
What constitutes a federal crime, and how should individuals convicted of federal crimes be punished? On July 28, 1789, Senator William S. Johnson introduced the first provision for crimes against the nation.
The Crimes Act delineated crimes against the nation and their punishments, defining a category of felonies nonexistent before the Constitution. The Act codified criminal procedure in cases of felonies, established diplomatic immunity, and set a statute of limitations for federal crimes. It included specific punishments for various crimes. Death by hanging was the penalty mandated for the crimes of treason, murder, robbery within maritime jurisdiction, counterfeiting, and piracy.
An Act for the Punishment of Certain Crimes Against the U.S., Sen 1A-B1, 7/28/1789, Records of the U.S. Senate

congressarchives:

225th Anniversary of the First Congress: We’ll be posting documents and stories highlighting the establishment of the new government under the Constitution through March 2016.

What constitutes a federal crime, and how should individuals convicted of federal crimes be punished? On July 28, 1789, Senator William S. Johnson introduced the first provision for crimes against the nation.

The Crimes Act delineated crimes against the nation and their punishments, defining a category of felonies nonexistent before the Constitution. The Act codified criminal procedure in cases of felonies, established diplomatic immunity, and set a statute of limitations for federal crimes. It included specific punishments for various crimes. Death by hanging was the penalty mandated for the crimes of treason, murder, robbery within maritime jurisdiction, counterfeiting, and piracy.

An Act for the Punishment of Certain Crimes Against the U.S., Sen 1A-B1, 7/28/1789, Records of the U.S. Senate

lbjlibrary:

July 28, 1967. Rostow sends this memo to President Johnson regarding growing violence in China related to the Cultural Revolution. In a memo that Rostow received from Alfred Jenkins on July 21st, Jenkins reported:

“The pace of social disintegration in China at present is even greater than it was in January and February. Evidence from many sources gives a picture of turbulence and confusion, in varying degree, but in each of the 26 provinces of China!”
—memo, Jenkins to Rostow, 7/21/67, #49, “CHICOM - Cultural Revolution, July - December 1967,” Files of Alfred Jenkins, National Security File, Box 2, LBJ Presidential Library.

—scanned document memo, Rostow to LBJ, 7/28/67, #47, “CHICOM - Cultural Revolution, July - December 1967, Files of Alfred Jenkins, National Security File, Box 2, LBJ Presidential Library.

lbjlibrary:

July 28, 1967. Rostow sends this memo to President Johnson regarding growing violence in China related to the Cultural Revolution. In a memo that Rostow received from Alfred Jenkins on July 21st, Jenkins reported:

“The pace of social disintegration in China at present is even greater than it was in January and February. Evidence from many sources gives a picture of turbulence and confusion, in varying degree, but in each of the 26 provinces of China!”

—memo, Jenkins to Rostow, 7/21/67, #49, “CHICOM - Cultural Revolution, July - December 1967,” Files of Alfred Jenkins, National Security File, Box 2, LBJ Presidential Library.

—scanned document memo, Rostow to LBJ, 7/28/67, #47, “CHICOM - Cultural Revolution, July - December 1967, Files of Alfred Jenkins, National Security File, Box 2, LBJ Presidential Library.