Today's Document

Apr 24

congressarchives:

This House report confirms that the previously selected members of Congress met George Washington in New Jersey, escorted him into the city, and showed him to his residence as originally recommended in a House report from April 15, 1789.
House Report on Receiving the President of the United States at the Place of His Embarkation from New Jersey, 4/24/1789, Records of the U.S. House of Representatives (NAID 7820247)

congressarchives:

This House report confirms that the previously selected members of Congress met George Washington in New Jersey, escorted him into the city, and showed him to his residence as originally recommended in a House report from April 15, 1789.

House Report on Receiving the President of the United States at the Place of His Embarkation from New Jersey, 4/24/1789, Records of the U.S. House of Representatives (NAID 7820247)

April is Jazz Appreciation Month - catch this first program in the usnatarchives' Jazz at the National Archives series!
usnatarchives:

Beginning in the 1950s, the U.S. Government used jazz as a diplomatic tool during the Cold War. John Edward Hasse—author, curator, biographer of Duke Ellington and founder of the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra—leads a discussion focusing on efforts by the United States Information Agency, the Voice of America, and the U.S. Department of State. Panelists include Former Ambassador David T. Killion, who organized International Jazz Day for UNESCO; David Ensor, current Director of the Voice of America; and historian Penny Von Eschen, author of Satchmo Blows Up the World: Jazz Ambassadors Play the Cold War.
Join us on Thursday, April 24, at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).
This is the first in a series of programs, Jazz at the National Archives, made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

“Washington, D.C.: American jazz notables perform during a recent charity concert sponsored by Mrs. Dwight D. Eisenhower, wife of the President of the U.S. and the Congressional Wives Circle of Friendship House, a children’s neighborhood recreation center in Southwest Washington. Left to right: Harvey Phillips tuba; Bob Wilbur, clarinet; Lou McGarity, trombone; Dick Carey, trumpet, and Charlie Byrd, guitar."  Circa 1960.From the Records of the United States Information Agency (RG 306.PS.397.59.20856)

April is Jazz Appreciation Month - catch this first program in the usnatarchivesJazz at the National Archives series!

usnatarchives:

Beginning in the 1950s, the U.S. Government used jazz as a diplomatic tool during the Cold War. John Edward Hasse—author, curator, biographer of Duke Ellington and founder of the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra—leads a discussion focusing on efforts by the United States Information Agency, the Voice of America, and the U.S. Department of State. Panelists include Former Ambassador David T. Killion, who organized International Jazz Day for UNESCO; David Ensor, current Director of the Voice of America; and historian Penny Von Eschen, author of Satchmo Blows Up the World: Jazz Ambassadors Play the Cold War.

Join us on Thursday, April 24, at 7 p.m. in the William McGowan Theater. Watch live online (http://www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) or join us in person (enter the National Archives Building through the Special Events entrance at Seventh Street and Constitution Avenue).

This is the first in a series of programs, Jazz at the National Archives, made possible in part by the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Natixis Global Asset Management.

Washington, D.C.: American jazz notables perform during a recent charity concert sponsored by Mrs. Dwight D. Eisenhower, wife of the President of the U.S. and the Congressional Wives Circle of Friendship House, a children’s neighborhood recreation center in Southwest Washington. Left to right: Harvey Phillips tuba; Bob Wilbur, clarinet; Lou McGarity, trombone; Dick Carey, trumpet, and Charlie Byrd, guitar."  Circa 1960.
F
rom the Records of the United States Information Agency (RG 306.PS.397.59.20856)

Take your Child to Work Day

One of the spinners in Whitnel Cotton Mill. She was 51 inches high. Has been in the mill one year. Sometimes works at night. Runs 4 sides - 48 [cents] a day. When asked how old she was, she hesitated, then said, “I don’t remember,” then confidentially, “I’m not old enough to work, but do just the same.” Out of 50 employees, ten children about her size. Whitnel, N.C., 12/22/1908

Taken by investigative photographer Lewis Hine, this photograph is one of a series of black-and-white prints given to the Children’s Bureau by the National Child Labor Committee. The almost five hundred photographs represent a fraction of the approximately 5,000 photographs Hine took for the committee to document working and living conditions for children.
(A sobering reminder that bringing children to work was not always a purely educational experience or a special occasion.)  
We’ll be observing Take Your Child to Work Day at the National Archives on the week of May 5, to coincide with Public Service Recognition Week. Stay tuned!

Take your Child to Work Day

One of the spinners in Whitnel Cotton Mill. She was 51 inches high. Has been in the mill one year. Sometimes works at night. Runs 4 sides - 48 [cents] a day. When asked how old she was, she hesitated, then said, “I don’t remember,” then confidentially, “I’m not old enough to work, but do just the same.” Out of 50 employees, ten children about her size. Whitnel, N.C., 12/22/1908

Taken by investigative photographer Lewis Hine, this photograph is one of a series of black-and-white prints given to the Children’s Bureau by the National Child Labor Committee. The almost five hundred photographs represent a fraction of the approximately 5,000 photographs Hine took for the committee to document working and living conditions for children.

(A sobering reminder that bringing children to work was not always a purely educational experience or a special occasion.)  

We’ll be observing Take Your Child to Work Day at the National Archives on the week of May 5, to coincide with Public Service Recognition Week. Stay tuned!

Apr 23

[video]

Do you have what it takes to succeed for Administrative Professionals Day?

Among the holdings of the National Archives at Fort Worth are the records of the Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training (RG 300).  These documents, dating from the late 1950s to the late 1960s, offer insights into how secretaries were viewed and trained.  They also offer a glimpse of an era gone by.

"Brooke’s Your Reflector Number I (Personality) Quiz" from the Secretarial Training Program in Waco, Texas from January 1959 to June 1959 (Online catalog identifier 7280725).


This flashback comes courtesy of our colleagues at the National Archives at Fort Worth, and their blog series: Flashback! Secretaries of the 1950s and 1960s: Do You Have What it Takes to be One
How did you score? Do you have a “good personality rating for the business world”?

Do you have what it takes to succeed for Administrative Professionals Day?

Among the holdings of the National Archives at Fort Worth are the records of the Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training (RG 300).  These documents, dating from the late 1950s to the late 1960s, offer insights into how secretaries were viewed and trained.  They also offer a glimpse of an era gone by.

"Brooke’s Your Reflector Number I (Personality) Quiz" from the Secretarial Training Program in Waco, Texas from January 1959 to June 1959 (Online catalog identifier 7280725).

This flashback comes courtesy of our colleagues at the National Archives at Fort Worth, and their blog series: Flashback! Secretaries of the 1950s and 1960s: Do You Have What it Takes to be One

How did you score? Do you have a “good personality rating for the business world”?

(via todaysdocument)


"Photograph of Keystone Bombardment Airplanes of the 2nd Bombardment Group Flying Over Washington, DC, 04/23/1931"
From the series: "Airscapes" of American and Foreign Areas, 1917 - 1964

(The future site of the National Archives building is also visible in the lower left-hand corner. Construction would begin later that year, with the official ground-breaking in September, 1931.)

"Photograph of Keystone Bombardment Airplanes of the 2nd Bombardment Group Flying Over Washington, DC, 04/23/1931"

From the series: "Airscapes" of American and Foreign Areas, 1917 - 1964

(The future site of the National Archives building is also visible in the lower left-hand corner. Construction would begin later that year, with the official ground-breaking in September, 1931.)

Apr 22

It’s Earth Day!

"City farmers" tend their gardens in the Fenway administered by the Fenway Civic Association. Four hundred twenty-five gardens are tilled on these five acres in metropolitan Boston, 04/1973.
Ernst Halberstadt, photographer.  From the series: DOCUMERICA: The Environmental Protection Agency’s Program to Photographically Document Subjects of Environmental Concern, compiled 1972 - 1977

This year’s Earth Day theme is “Green Cities” and the gardeners of Boston’s Fenway Victory Gardens have been at it since 1942!  (We wonder if cityofbostonarchives has any other photos from these historic gardens…)
Find out what you can do in your city or community for Earth Day!

It’s Earth Day!

"City farmers" tend their gardens in the Fenway administered by the Fenway Civic Association. Four hundred twenty-five gardens are tilled on these five acres in metropolitan Boston, 04/1973.

Ernst Halberstadt, photographer.  From the series: DOCUMERICA: The Environmental Protection Agency’s Program to Photographically Document Subjects of Environmental Concern, compiled 1972 - 1977

This year’s Earth Day theme is “Green Cities” and the gardeners of Boston’s Fenway Victory Gardens have been at it since 1942!  (We wonder if cityofbostonarchives has any other photos from these historic gardens…)

Find out what you can do in your city or community for Earth Day!


“THE FAIR Are you ready? It’s here!!The long-awaited New York World’s Fair, which took four years to create, opens its doors to the first of 70,000,000 expected visitors. Dominated by the Fair’s symbol THE UNISPHERE (which means Peace through understanding) the billion-dollar-baby of Robert Moses covers 646 acres…”
From: Universal Newsreel Volume 37, Issue 33, 04/23/1964

The 1964 New York World’s Fair opened fifty years ago this week, on April 22nd, with the theme of “Man’s Achievements in an Expanding Universe.” If this extended Universal News story leaves you with the impression that the fair was not a runaway success, that’s because it wasn’t. The fair was not sanctioned by the Bureau of International Expositions, and it was sandwiched between the official 1962 Seattle World’s Fair and Expo 67 in Montreal, making it a less compelling draw. The opening day’s unfortunately dreary weather was emblematic of the entire two-season event; total attendance for the fair came in at fifty-one million, yet that fell short of the expected seventy million visitors. You might recognize the Unisphere sculpture and “flying saucer” towers in the still below from the 1997 film Men in Black, where they feature prominently.
via Media Matters » This Week in Universal News: The New York World’s Fair Opens, 1964

THE FAIR Are you ready? It’s here!!
The long-awaited New York World’s Fair, which took four years to create, opens its doors to the first of 70,000,000 expected visitors. Dominated by the Fair’s symbol THE UNISPHERE (which means Peace through understanding) the billion-dollar-baby of Robert Moses covers 646 acres…”

From: Universal Newsreel Volume 37, Issue 33, 04/23/1964

The 1964 New York World’s Fair opened fifty years ago this week, on April 22nd, with the theme of “Man’s Achievements in an Expanding Universe.” If this extended Universal News story leaves you with the impression that the fair was not a runaway success, that’s because it wasn’t. The fair was not sanctioned by the Bureau of International Expositions, and it was sandwiched between the official 1962 Seattle World’s Fair and Expo 67 in Montreal, making it a less compelling draw. The opening day’s unfortunately dreary weather was emblematic of the entire two-season event; total attendance for the fair came in at fifty-one million, yet that fell short of the expected seventy million visitors. You might recognize the Unisphere sculpture and “flying saucer” towers in the still below from the 1997 film Men in Black, where they feature prominently.

via Media Matters » This Week in Universal News: The New York World’s Fair Opens, 1964

Apr 21

[video]

Apr 20

[video]

Apr 19

[video]

The Day After the Doolittle Raid
Generalissimo and Madame Chiang Kai Shek and Lieutenant General Joseph W. Stilwell pose together the day after the Doolittle Raid on Japan.  This raid also known as the Tokyo Raid was the first time American forces attacked Japan at home.

Generalissimo and Madame Chiang Kai Shek and Lieutenant General Joseph W. Stilwell, Commanding General, China Expeditionary Forces, on the day following Japanese bombing attack [Doolittle Raid]. Maymyo, Burma., 04/19/1942

The Day After the Doolittle Raid

Generalissimo and Madame Chiang Kai Shek and Lieutenant General Joseph W. Stilwell pose together the day after the Doolittle Raid on Japan.  This raid also known as the Tokyo Raid was the first time American forces attacked Japan at home.

Generalissimo and Madame Chiang Kai Shek and Lieutenant General Joseph W. Stilwell, Commanding General, China Expeditionary Forces, on the day following Japanese bombing attack [Doolittle Raid]. Maymyo, Burma., 04/19/1942

(Source: research.archives.gov)

Apr 18

Apollo 13 Astronauts Safe on Earth
An oxygen tank explosion on day two of the mission led to great hardships for the crew.  The craft lost cabin heat, had limited power, and had a water shortage.  The crew returned to earth on April 17 and are seen here meeting with President Richard Nixon on day later.  The mission was dramatized in the movie Apollo 13.

Richard M. Nixon meeting with Apollo 13 astronauts in Hawaii., 04/18/1970


More at the Apollo 13 Mission page at NASA.

Apollo 13 Astronauts Safe on Earth

An oxygen tank explosion on day two of the mission led to great hardships for the crew.  The craft lost cabin heat, had limited power, and had a water shortage.  The crew returned to earth on April 17 and are seen here meeting with President Richard Nixon on day later.  The mission was dramatized in the movie Apollo 13.

Richard M. Nixon meeting with Apollo 13 astronauts in Hawaii., 04/18/1970

More at the Apollo 13 Mission page at NASA.

(Source: research.archives.gov)

Apr 17

[video]

Apr 16

In Vermont, even dogs get excited for the Bookwagon!
Happy National Bookmobile Day!

From “The Day the Books Went Blank”, a 1961 educational film intended to show the importance of maintaining quality libraries, from The Library Extension Agencies of the six New England States.

In Vermont, even dogs get excited for the Bookwagon!

Happy National Bookmobile Day!

From “The Day the Books Went Blank”, a 1961 educational film intended to show the importance of maintaining quality libraries, from The Library Extension Agencies of the six New England States.